Friday, September 24, 2010

Arminian Timeline


Date

Remonstrant

Anglican/Methodist

Baptist

1600’s

James
Arminius (1560-1609) Theologian and leader of the opposition of Calvinism
in Amsterdam and Leiden

Jan Uytenbogaert remonstrant led the meeting that produced
the
5
Points of the Remonstrants - 1610

Simon Episcopius
(1583-1643) - Arminius' greatest student and leader of the Remonstrants at Dort - Opra Theologica.

Hugo Grotius (1583
–1645) Imprisoned as a result of Dort.
First to articulate the Governmental Theory of the Atonement in A Defense of the Catholic Faith
Concerning the Satisfaction of Christ
. Commentaries.

Johannes
Arnoldi Corvinus
(1582-1650) – Response
to Peter Molina

Gerardus Vossius (1577-1649) - History
of the Pelagian Controversy

1618
OPINIONS OF THE REMONSTRANTS

The
Arminian Confession 1621

Philip van Limborch
(1633-1712) (A
Complete System, or Body of Divinity
)

Peter Baro (1534-1599)

Daniel Tilenus (1563–1633) Bridge
between the Remonstrants and Early English Arminianism.
Convinced of Arminianism by Corvinus and passed that influence to Womock

Laurence Womock (1612–1686) – Author
of the Calvinist Cabinet Unlocked and
The
Result of False Principles: or, Error Convicted by its Own Evidence
John Goodwin (1593-1665) Author of Redemption
Redeemed
, An
Exposition Romans 9
and a
Christian Theology

Lancelot Andrews (1555-1626) - Sermons


John
Smyth (1570-1612) & Thomas Helwys (1550-1616)– Cofounders
of Baptist Church
The
First Baptist Confession 1611


Thomas
Grantham (1634-1692) General Baptist (Works)

Henry
Denne – General Baptist (d 1661)


1700’s




Daniel Whitby
(1638-1726) - His classic work Discourses on the 5 Points
drew famous responses from Calvinists John Gill (The Cause of God and Truth)
and Jonathan Edwards (Inquiry into the Will).

John
Wesley
(1703-1791)
Founder of Methodism

Charles
Wesley (1707 –1788)

John Fletcher (1729-1782)Works: Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3,

Volume 4
Thomas Coke
(1747-1814)

Joseph Benson (1748-1821)


Dan
Taylor – General Baptist (1738-1816) (Works)



Benjamin
Randall – General Baptist (1749-1808) (Works)

1800’s



Adam Clarke (1762-1832)-
Commentaries

Joseph Sutcliffe
(1762-1856) -Commentaries

Richard Watson
(1781-1833)
- His
Theological Institutes
is perhaps
the best Methodist Systematic Theology

Thomas William JenkynExtent of the Atonement (1835)
S.G. Burney Atonement (1888)

Willbur Fisk (1792 – 1839) - Calvinistic Controversy

Samuel Wakefied (1799-1895) -Christian Theology

Amos Binney (1802-1878) System
of Divinity

Daniel Whedon (1808-1885) The Freedom of the Will. Commentaries.


Miner Raymond
(1811-1897)- Systemtaic Theology,
Volume
1
, Volume
2
and Volume
3



Thomas O. Summers
(1812-1882)-
Commentary
Matthew,
Mark,
Luke

John Miley (1813-1895)

Randolph S. Foster
(1820-1903)
Objections to
CALVINISM as it is

William Burt Pope
(1822-1903)
Volume
1
and Volume
2
of his Systematic Theology
Daniel Steele (1824-1914) Commentaries on Leviticus,
Numbers, and Deuteronomy
, Joshua - 2 Samuel, and John's Epistles
Benjamin Field
(1827-1869)-

Albert Nash, Perseverance and Apostasy (1871)


Frédéric Louis Godet
(1812 -1900) Not a Methodist. Commentaries on
John
Volume 1
, John Volume 2, and Romans


Joseph Beet
(1840-1924)
Commentary on Romans


Ransom
Dunn – General Baptist - A
Discourse on the Freedom of the Will (1850)

A. D.
Williams – General Baptist (1825 - 1894)

David
Marks – General Baptist (1805-1845)

Jabez Burns - General Baptist
(1805-1876) (Works)



E. Y.
Mullins (1860-1928) wrote Baptist Beliefs and W. T. Conner (1877-1952) – wrote
Christian Doctrine and The Gospel of Redemption. Mullins and Conner did not call themselves Arminians, but they were instrumental in the decline of
Calvinism within the Southern Baptist Convention.

14 comments:

SammyBoy said...

Can you continue the timeline? What prominent names today are good representatives of the Arminian viewpoint?

Godismyjudge said...

Hi SammyBoy,

I am not sure I know enough to do that. I do know some key Arminian names today. But the problem is I don't know enough about the 1900's and generally the picture gets broader and broader and it's hard to keep track. Some more recent Arminian Theologians that I have enjoyed are:

William Lane Craig, I. Howard Marshall, Scott McKnight, William Klein, Grant Osborne, Robert Shank, Ben Witherington III, Roger Olson, Jerry Walls, Joe Dongell, Brian Abasciano, F. Leroy Forlines, Robert E. Picirilli, Jack Cottrell, Roger Forster, Paul Marston, Keith Stanglin and Matthew Pinson.

My personal favorites are Craig and Picirilli.

God be with you,
Dan

The Seeking Disciple said...

Excellent timeline. Where did you get this or did you create it? It's excellent.

Godismyjudge said...

Hi Roy,

Glad you like it. I built it.

God be with you,
Dan

A.M. Mallett said...

Good piece of work ... got it bookmarked

Kevin Jackson said...

Just ran across this (behind on my surfing), very nicely done.

Godismyjudge said...

Thanks Trav & Kevin!

God be with you,
Dan

DonaldH said...

This is very helpful. And thanks for listing the recent Arminian theologians as well. I like Roger Olson and William Lane Craig. And Picirilli.

Godismyjudge said...

Thanks Donald. I tend to think Picirilli is underrated these days, but I really enjoyed Grace, Faith and Freewill.

God be with you,
Dan

A.M. Mallett said...

Dan,
I have come to appreciate two notable theologians as having considerable influence in shaping my current theological view, Picirilli and Forlines. Grace Faith Freewill and Forlines Quest For Truth have been instrumental me me in the past few years. Forlines in particular has captured my interest with his baptist and classical Arminian insight.

Godismyjudge said...

Thanks Trav. I liked Quest for Truth as well. If I recall correctly Forlines doesn't call himself an Arminian, even though his views were in lock step with Arminian theology. Yet another example of a Baptist avoiding the name Arminian.

God be with you,
Dan

A.M. Mallett said...

In the preface to The Quest, Forlines indicates that the work takes a distinctly Arminian presentation, what he calls "classical Arminianism". He makes the distinction between his view i.e. classical Arminiansim from that of the Wesleyan Arminianism. In that sense I think we can include Forlines as one who readily embraces his Arminianism. He may have changed since although I am not familiar with that.

Godismyjudge said...

My mistake. Sorry about that.

God be with you,
Dan

Anonymous said...

I found in a google books Philip Pugh's birth and death dates that you might want to add to your timeline. (1817-1871)

Nice work,
Steve